Monthly Archives: June 2019

//June

Keep your pets home and safe!

By | June 29th, 2019|Categories: Pet Advice|

http://ohiopetexpert.com

By | June 19th, 2019|Categories: Pet Advice|

Have you really ever investigated what it says on those little flags that are put on residents' lawns after chemical applications? Or questioned the lingering smell or residue after bug spray inside your home? The consequences of traps and deadly bait? How long should those flags be displayed? Just what does the real warning to "stay off" mean to people, pets and our environment? Were you crazed by the ants you found in the house and just started spraying or signed up for a service without digging deep into the potential chemical consequences? Exposure to lawn chemicals can occur from the winds blowing it around. We even bring those chemicals in our homes because they are on our clothing. You do not have to have a pet to get fleas. You can bring them in on your tennis shoes! Animals not only breathe in the chemicals, they can also absorb them through their pads and skin. Some dogs like to lick and eat grass. Unfortunately they can't read the warning sign. Nor can they comprehend the deadly consequences of herbicides and fertilizers. To protect your pets, children and yourself, have a clear understanding of the toxicity of dry and wet [...]

Dental Health

By | June 7th, 2019|Categories: Pet Advice, Pet Safety Tips|

“Dental health is a very important part of your pet’s overall health, and dental problems can cause, or be caused by, other health problems.  Your pet’s teeth and gums should be checked at least once a year by your veterinarian to check for early signs of a problem and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.” (The American Veterinary Medical Association)

It’s summer! Please don’t leave your dog in your car!

By | June 4th, 2019|Categories: Cleveland News, General, Pet Advice, Pet Safety Tips|

Every spring and summer there are many well-meaning animal lovers who leave their (primarily) dogs in vehicles while they shop or run errands without realizing that their beloved pet may end up suffering — or even dying — due to the effects of heatstroke. Most people don’t know that even on mild days, with temperatures in the low to mid-70’s, the temperature inside a parked car can quickly reach 100 degrees. In warmer, 85-degree weather, temperatures can reach 120 degrees within a half hour, even if a car window is left open a crack. Leaving animals unattended in a vehicle on a warm or hot day  is not only unsafe, it’s also illegal. Leaving an animal unattended in a vehicle under conditions that endanger the health or well-being of an animal due to heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, or lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably cause suffering, disability, or death is a crime that carries with it up to six months in jail in L.A. (Penal Code 597.7). Click here to read the entire article on Petfinder.com and for links to download the Hot Oven, Hot Car poster.

What to do if your dog’s been skunked

By | June 4th, 2019|Categories: Cleveland News, General, Pet Advice|

Spring brings us pretty flowers, chirping birds, and litters of kittens that come from roaming unneutered cats. Other wildlife comes out of their winter nests to forage for food and mating too. Typically this activity is at a peak in early spring and fall when the weather is warmer. One of the most active critters that we see or smell the entire spring and summer season is the little black-and-white varmint known as a skunk. They are typically active at dawn and dusk. No matter their size, skunks can secrete from their specialized anal sacs for several feet a potent and foul smelling oil that sometimes can be harmful – even deadly – to dogs if the spray gets in their eyes, nose or throat. Skunks have tested positive for rabies in the United States and Canada. This is another well-documented reason why our pets need to be current on immunizations. Save yourself the stress and mess of using tomato juice, vinegar, pretty smelling soaps or shampoo. There are three safe and effective products to have on hand for a veterinarian-approved recipe you can make in your own kitchen to neutralize the skunk spray on your dog. Simply mix together 1/4 [...]